EKSA E900 Pro USB Gaming Headset Review

Top- notch features for a budget price and bass-heavy audio

Image for post
Image for post
Photo taken by the author.
Image for post
Image for post
Photo taken by the author.

OVERVIEW

The EKSA E900 Pro is a closed-back, wired gaming headset with both USB and 3.5mm connection options, detachable cables, a detachable noise-cancelling microphone, and a nice carrying bag. The USB connection port on the headset is USB-C, something that countless other expensive headphones and headsets haven’t yet upgraded to. Also, unlike other gaming headsets with a USB mode, there’s no dongle present or required. The DAC/amp circuitry is built right into the body of the headset.

Image for post
Image for post
Photo taken by the author.

SOUND SIGNATURE

In the early days of gaming headsets, almost every model had a boomy, aggressive, bass-dominated sound that emphasized explosions and impact at all costs. They got a poor reputation for having muddy, inaccurate audio as a result. It wasn’t until the launch and massive success of the original HyperX Cloud that gaming headsets started to widely experiment with cleaner, more accurate sound signatures.

Image for post
Image for post
Here’s the same goofy virtual surround software from the Redragon H510, only in blue this time! Photo taken by the author.

USB FUNCTION

The EKSA E900 Pro has the exact same C-Media sound hardware built into it as the Redragon H510 Zeus I recently reviewed, to the point where the drivers are inter-compatible and my system couldn’t distinguish between the headsets. The EKSA driver control panel is blue, and the H510’s is red, but they’re otherwise functionally identical.

Image for post
Image for post
These pads are completely awesome. Photo taken by the author.

COMFORT

The E900 Pro combines super soft slow-rebounding memory foam ear cushions with a nice squishy headband pad, and as a result it’s impressively comfy compared with headsets of literally any price. The adjustment range for the ear cups isn’t the largest, and I have to wear them almost fully extended, but the impressive ear pads seal well around my thin-armed glasses.

Image for post
Image for post
The slight angle of the ear pads towards the bottom is a hint at their clamping force, though it stretches comfortably after the first day of use. Photo taken by the author.

BUILD/DESIGN

If you’ve ever seen a HyperX headset, you’ll recognize the design here. The E900 Pro has all the same hallmarks. Aluminum forks hold the cups to the headband, and small exposed wires run to each cup.

Image for post
Image for post
If a $40 headset can use USB-C, so can literally every headphone and headset. No more excuses! Photo taken by the author.

MICROPHONE

Just like the Redragon H510, the microphone here is shockingly great for the price. The E900’s mic uses an acoustic noise-canceling capsule which does a decent job quieting the background and my mechanical keyboard keys. During my one long gaming session, I had a fan on in my room and my friend said he could’t hear it at all. The microphone isn’t the most sensitive I’ve used, and the overall tone is a little bit muffled and dark, probably due to the noise cancellation.

Image for post
Image for post
This is the nicest included headset or headphone bag I’ve received in a very long time. Photo taken by the author.

FEATURES/EXTRAS

The E900 Pro shines in the features department. You get both a 3.5mm cable and a USB-C to USB-A cable in the box, and each one has a small sticker explaining the scenarios that you might want to use each one for. Both cables use a basic rubber coating and are a little bit springy, but they get the job done.

Image for post
Image for post
Don’t take the cable’s warning too seriously, as the USB surround mode is the worst of the circuitry’s functions. Photo taken by the author.
Image for post
Image for post
The logo on my headband is slightly crooked, but the basic build here doesn’t ruin its good qualities. Photo taken by the author.

FINAL THOUGHTS

The EKSA E900 Pro has the ear pads, USB functionality, carrying bag, microphone, and overall feature set of a $200 gaming product combined with the build of a much cheaper one and a sound signature that hasn’t been seen widely since 2013.

Written by

I do radio voice work by day, and write by day and night. I studied film and production. I love audio, design, and music. Also video games.

Get the Medium app

A button that says 'Download on the App Store', and if clicked it will lead you to the iOS App store
A button that says 'Get it on, Google Play', and if clicked it will lead you to the Google Play store